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March 14th–20th, 2016 / Cinema Muzeul Țăranului, Cinema Elvire Popesco, Universitatea Națională de Muzică / the 6th edition

Rebel With a Cause (program for teenagers)

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Rebel With a Cause (program for teenagers)

Directed by: 
SHANE DANIELSEN
Inspired, among others, by Roman Polanski’s Repulsion, as the director himself acknowledges, Shane Danielasen’s directorial debut was selected in the official Palme d’Or competition at Cannes Film Festival 2015. The Guests, set in the Eastern Europe of the 1960's, follows Anna as she admits some uninvited guests into her home while waiting for her husband’s return. Shortly, an almost psychotic Anna is assailed by shadows and voices while pursuing a desperate quest for her baby in her own home, by now morphed into a nightmarish setting. This short film is like a fit of delirium, leaving Anna a different person than she had been at first. As for us viewers, we are confused, perhaps firghtened, but by no means unmoved. (Andreea Udrea, BIEFF)
Directed by: 
KAZIK RADWANSKI
In Cutaway, premiered at Locarno Film Festival 2014, director Kazik Radwanski succeeds in telling a whole lot about the life story of a young man using nothing more besides close-ups of his hands in motion, and of objects upon which they take action, the latter turning into our only temporal and allegorical references. All we are to know about the personage is conveyed by the image of his hands which become, in the absence of dialogue and facial expressions, metaphors of his internal experiences. The realism of the shots and the minimalistic approach, together with an intentional lack of background information, enhance rather than restrain a profound empathy with the character, bestowing an emotional quality on the film, its objectivity notwithstanding. (Andreea Udrea, BIEFF)
Directed by: 
CARMEN JAQUIER
World premiered at Locarno Film Festival 2016, the short film The River Under the Tongue takes us on an intimate journey and makes us witness (or partake in) the infringement of one’s hidden thoughts and desires. After reading his elder daughter’s diary, one mother, feeling to what extend they have drifted apart, takes her and her younger daughter for a walk in the forest. But above the scenic background, above the pictures that linger on the elder daughter’s lips, skin and nymph-like hair, floats the erotic poetry of her diary’s entries. After all our senses are engaged, the perversity of infringing on one’s intimacy is belittled by the philosophic and poetic sensuality. (Andreea Udrea, BIEFF)
Directed by: 
CÉLINE DEVAUX
In Sunday Lunch, the experimental delirium of hand-drawn animation, music and voice encapsulates the essence of all family lunches’ atmosphere. Jean, a young adult, stuck in the family Sunday lunch routine, has to cope with the usual weekly inquiries and boredom. The lunch guests – Jean’s parents, maiden aunts and grandmother – take a keen interest in his personal life, sexual orientation, job and house. The family reunion stimulates nostalgic thoughts, discussions on traffic and Tupperware and comments on taxes and life. Enhanced by comedian’s Vincent Macaigne voice and the instrumental rhythm, the animation’s originality and visual delirium hint at both the guests’ tipsiness and unconsciousness. In the end, the French director’s Céline Devaux animation sets the scene for a meditation on growing up, the passing of time, and their effects on intrafamilial dynamics. (Andreea Udrea, BIEFF)
Directed by: 
LEON PRUDOVSKY
The year is 1991. Young Misha together with his family and his aunt Roza migrate from the Soviet Union to Israel. Using a home-video camera, the 12-year-old boy documents this journey and more than 20 years later, he recreates in Welcome and... Our Condolences, the emotional state and the reactions generated inside himself by the whole immigration process. Merging original and staged shots, director Leon Prudovsky pushes the account of the traumatic experiences of immigration towards the absurd, as Aunt Roza’s passing away in the aeroplane, during the flight to Israel, triggers a series of tragicomic episodes, which convey the feelings of confusion, helplessness and senselessness experienced by the director at the age of 12. (Andreea Udrea, BIEFF)