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March 14th–20th, 2016 / Cinema Muzeul Țăranului, Cinema Elvire Popesco, Universitatea Națională de Muzică / the 6th edition

Rotterdam Film Festival: You Run Through My Veins

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Rotterdam Film Festival: You Run Through My Veins

With the support of: 

 
Curatorial presentation by Adina Marin
Taking further the inspiring collaboration with the innovative International Film Festival Rotterdam (IFFR), BIEFF presents some of the most thought-provoking 2015 Tiger Awards for Short Films Nominees within the theme program You Run Through My Veins. Going beyond the conventional views on family and, in particular, on trans-generational dynamics, both at personal and society level, the works included in this program are an invitation to reflect on the ways we perceive reality, revealing it from unexpected subjective perspectives.

Questioning beliefs and practices of ancestral divination in South-African societies, visual artist Ben Russell (winner of BIEFF Main Award in 2013 with River Rites), comes back to Bucharest with Greetings to the Ancestors, winner of the Tiger Award for Short Film, an investigation on the divine power of dreams and the invisible ways through which the spirits of our forefathers still live in our blood. Ben Russell intermixes ingredients of documentary, ethnography and dream cinema, to illustrate the fluidity of the borders of consciousness, which dissolve and expand. The camera is either anthropologically engaged in the trance-inducing ceremony of the Jericho Congregation, or quietly tracking healers or poets who give account of vivid dreams induced by the hallucinogen African Dream Root, and eventually races along the African landscape, a surreal red filter applied over its lens. It is an exercise in what Ben Russell defines as psychedelic ethnography: a way to allow for the apparently objective facts of existence to be constantly reframed by radical subjective experience.
 
An intimate space where the highly personal note fuses with the general human condition is created by Nina Yuen in Raymond, allegedly a monologue of the artist's father, in fact an indirect account of her own family background. The visually striking narrative moves freely and playfully from calculations of the most curious sorts, such as the total number of miles driven from their home to her school or the equivalent in calories of the quantity of fruit the father has harvested during seventeen years, to reminiscences of his childhood, and memories of him as a young father and of her as a baby. At some point, the artist ingeniously weaves deep subjects into the fabric, like the origins of the universe, mortality and the passage of time, with captivating effect, creating a tender and enchanting personal discourse on the spiritual and emotional baggage bestowed on her.
 
In an attempt to plot his own existence against the coordinates time, place and family history, Martijn Veldhoen turns his camera on his mother's life story in a unique cinematic experiment. Time and Place, A Talk with My Mom retraces fifty years in the life of Veldhoen's mother. She fell in love with his father, they had four children, then a painful separation followed and the wearisome years as a single mother of four. Beyond reminiscences of her personal story, we witness the turbulent cultural and social changes of the sixties, seventies, and eighties. The recorded material being insufficient, Martijn Veldhoen masterfully employs original visual reconstructions to create a personal and affectionate narrative.
Directed by: 
NINA YUEN
An intimate space where the highly personal note fuses with the general human condition is created by Nina Yuen in Raymond, allegedly a monologue of the artist's father, in fact an indirect account of her own family background. The visually striking narrative moves freely and playfully from calculations of the most curious sorts, such as the total number of miles driven from their home to her school or the equivalent in calories of the quantity of fruit the father has harvested during seventeen years, to reminiscences of his childhood, and memories of him as a young father and of her as a baby. At some point, the artist ingeniously weaves deep subjects into the fabric, like the origins of the universe, mortality and the passage of time, with captivating effect, creating a tender and enchanting personal discourse on the spiritual and emotional baggage bestowed on her. (Adina Marin, BIEFF)
Directed by: 
MARTIJN VELDHOEN
In an attempt to plot his own existence against the coordinates 'time', 'place' and family history, Martijn Veldhoen turns his camera on his mother's life story in a unique cinematic experiment. Time and Place, a Talk with My Mom retraces fifty years in the life of Veldhoen's mother. She fell in love with his father, they had four children, then a painful separation followed and the wearisome years as a single mother of four. Beyond reminiscences of her personal story, we witness the turbulent cultural and social changes of the sixties, seventies, and eighties. The recorded material being insufficient, Martijn Veldhoen masterfully employs original visual reconstructions to create a personal and affectionate narrative. (Adina Marin, BIEFF 2016)
Directed by: 
BEN RUSSELL
Questioning beliefs and practices of ancestral divination in South-African societies, Greetings to the Ancestors, winner of the Tiger Award for Short Film, looks towards the invisible world and investigates the divine power of dreams. Ben Russell intermixes ingredients of documentary, ethnography and dream cinema, to illustrate the fluidity of the boders of consciousness, which dissolve and expand. The camera is either anthropologically engaged in the trance-inducing ceremony of the Jericho Congregation, or quietly tracking healers or poets who give account of vivid dreams induced by the hallucinogen African Dream Root, and eventually races along the African landscape, a surreal red filter applied over its lens. It is an expercise in what Ben Russel defines as psychedelic ethnography: a way to allow for the apparently objective facts of existence to be constantly reframed by radical subjective experience. (Adina Marin, BIEFF)